How many people does it take to assemble the world’s largest T. Rex?

A Dinosaur Named Sue arrived at Jacksonville’s Museum of Science and History in a series of large crates on large trucks. You’ll be able to see some of these crates in MOSH’s lobby.

Sue, an exact replica T. rex made from casts of the largest T. rex ever found, is on loan to the museum for the summer. See her any time from now to September. (With a name like Sue, I can’t help calling this dinosaur a “her,” but in truth, scientists don’t know whether it’s male or female).

A Dinosaur Named Sue arrived in a series of massive crates.

A Dinosaur Named Sue arrived in a series of massive crates. The precious cargo in this crate: her head.

The largest of the crates was her rib cage, weigh in at over 2,000 lbs.

Sue was found at a ranch in South Dakota, and her skeleton was 90% complete. This made her a giant — not only literally, but figuratively — in the world of science. Until Sue was found, the fullest T. rex skeleton ever found was only 60 % complete. Sue is also the largest T. rex ever found.

Four men and a woman worked together to get A Dinosaur Named Sue's head attached.

Four men and a woman worked together to get A Dinosaur Named Sue's head attached.

Sue’s head was braced with chains that were strapped to beams on the ceiling in MOSH’s second floor exhibition area. A group of five people worked together to slowly hoist the skull into the air.

Assembling A Dinosaur Named Sue at Jacksonville Museum of Science and History.

Once Sue's head was at the right height, it was attached to the rest of the body via a pipe-like mechanism hidden in her neck.

The “real” Sue was purchased in an auction for $8.4 million be the Chicago Field Museum.

Dinosaur Named Sue Being Assembled

Photographers and video camera men were hard at work, too, while Sue was put together at this "Sneek Peak" event for the press.

The T. rex has about 250 bones altogether.

Now Sue is ready for action.

Sue's head is lifted into place.

 

My little guy gives a "thumbs up" when Sue's head is in place.

My little guy was the first kid to meet Sue at MOSH, standing right with me for the press conference. He was so excited about the T. rex, and spontaneously became an interviewer, himself, at the event.

“Um, eh-scuse me, sir,” I heard him say at one point, “I need to know how long Sue’s neck is.”

At another point, I heard him ask a PR person, “Can you please tell me why Sue doesn’t have a head, ma’am?”

He was beyond thrilled when he saw the giant dinosaur get her head. He stood next to it, and he was the same height as one leg bone.

Read more about Sue, see professional photos and learn about the many interactive features included with her exhibit here.

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